Best meat cuts for your BBQ

Best meat cuts for your Bank Holiday BBQ: sirloin, pork neck fillets, dry age rib-eye and more!

Looks like the sun is going to make a badly wanted appearance this Bank Holiday weekend so waste no time, take your BBQ out of the shed, give it a good clean and enjoy the long weekend. We have tips for the best grilling experience!

When it comes to feeding hungry crowds on a hot day, serving up flame-loved meats is a must. And while the Irish barbecue is not exactly a fancy feast, after a long winter like the one we just had, it’s worth putting out some special cuts to celebrate!

From pork neck fillets to dry age beef, here’s our guide on how to make the most of your chosen cut of meat.  

Best for grill

Striploin, rib-eye, fillet steaks and yes, our ever-popular homemade speciality sausages are the top picks because they’re affordable, easy to barbecue and are packed with flavour.

However, cuts such as flank and rump are as tasty, cook quicker and are great budget-friendly options if you are entertaining a crowd.  

To maximise flavour and succulence, try grilling your meat on the bone, especially T-bone or sirloin on the bone. Why? Because the bone helps the flesh retain moisture and texture.

For something extra special we suggest a thick rib-eye on the bone.

Dry age

Dry ageing allows beef to age for up to six weeks in a cool room, exposed directly to the air, so the naturalDry Age Steak enzymes in the meat allow it to tenderise, darken and shrink, forming a crust that when trimmed, expose a rich red meat inside. 

For best results with dry age beef on  the grill, go for a nice fat cut about two to three centimetres thick, and to appreciate the full flavour profile, aim for medium-rare, seasoning with just rock salt and pepper.

But whatever you do, don’t leave it on the BBQ for too long, the ageing extracts some of the moisture, so dry-aged meat cooks quicker than other cuts.

Temperature tips

To make the most of your cut of meat, make sure your barbecue is “super hot and super clean” before cooking, even if it means you have to turn down the heat when grilling begins.

It’s also crucial to let meat warm to room temperature before you start cooking it – this relaxes the flesh and allows it to cook more evenly so you have a more tender and juicier meat and less chance of overcooking or drying out the steaks.

Once barbecuing begins, let the meat colour but only to the point when a little juice or blood still comes through when gently pressed. Flip once and let the other side colour, then lift the meat off the heat while it’s still pink in the middle and rest it on a plate, where it will keep cooking as it cools.   

You don’t have to keep touching and flipping it, just let it be – but don’t forget about it!

Go slow

But if you fancy trying something really different, how about a beef brisket, beef cheeks or beef short ribs – that you can leave braising in red wine overnight? You can also try pork neck fillet, chops, ribs or diced shoulder of pork, marinated overnight using simple ingredients such as good quality olive oil, garlic and herbs.

Either for the beef or the pork, after marinating, cover with foil in a baking tray or pot, then cook in the oven at low temperature (80C to 100C max) for 12 hours. The result is an incredibly juicy fall-apart meat, great for a pulled beef or pork sandwiches.

Hope you enjoy your Bank Holiday weekend – share your photos and tag us!